Not Gazpacho

Antipasto & Not Gazpacho

Not Gazpacho (with antipasto platter)

. . . but close!

Not Gazpacho

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Time: 20 min, plus refrigeration
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 46-ounce can or bottle of Clamato
  • hot sauce (Texas Pete or similar), to taste
  • 2 lemons, chopped, w/peel
  • 12-14 large shrimp, peeled
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • jalapeños, chopped, to taste
  • 1 avacado, peeled & chopped
  • cilantro, chopped, to taste
  • 2-4 stalks celery, chopped

Directions

Combine all, refrigerate overnight.

Notes

The basic recipe can be doubled or tripled for a crowd.

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Ditalini’s Chiles Rellenos

Ditalini and I recently joined a produce co-op.  Every Saturday we pick up two good-sized baskets of seasonal vegetables and fruit.  This Saturday we found eight big green chiles mixed in with our haul, and Ditalini decided to make chiles rellenos from scratch.  We used to make chiles rellenos using Ortega canned green chiles, but these turned out firmer and tastier than the canned kind, so we’re staying with fresh chiles from now on.  It’s a little harder using fresh peppers, because you have to get rid of the skin first (canned ones come prepared) … but the extra effort is worth it.

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Fresh poblano chiles, roasted & peeled

Ditalini's Chiles Rellenos

  • Servings: 3-6
  • Time: 2 hrs
  • Difficulty: medium
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Ingredients

  • 4-8 fresh green chiles (you can used canned green chiles if you can’t get fresh)
  • Monterey Jack or mozzarella cheese, sliced
  • flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 white or yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 small whole tomatoes
  • chicken broth
  • oil for cooking

Directions

Roast the chiles until the skin is blistered (you can do this over a fire or in the broiler, turning the chiles to blister the skin all around), then peel off the skin.  Slice each chili lengthwise and scrape out the seeds.  Place a couple of slices of cheese inside each chili, then roll the chiles in flour.

Separate the yolks and whites of the eggs.  Beat the egg whites until they peak, then beat in the yolks.  Dip each chili in the batter and fry in hot oil until golden brown.  Place on a paper towel on a warm platter and keep in a warm oven.

For the sauce, fry the onion in butter or oil until soft.  Crush tomatoes with a mortar and pestle, add to onions.  Add chicken broth to desired liquid consistency (we use about half a can), season with salt and pepper, let cook about five minutes.

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Ditalini’s chiles rellenos

Serve with Spanish rice, refried beans, and warm tortillas.

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Crouton’s Easy Split Pea Soup

Relatively easy, that is!  You can prepare it in the morning or early afternoon, then reheat and serve for dinner.  Actual kitchen prep time is about half an hour; cooking time is less than two hours.

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Crouton's Easy Split Pea Soup

  • Servings: 6
  • Time: 2 hrs
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 pkg dry split peas
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 3 or 4 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled & sliced
  • 1 potato, peeled & cubed
  • 1 ham steak, cut up
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • water (if needed)
  • salt & pepper to taste

Directions

Soak the peas overnight, drain & rinse, place in heavy pot, cover with chicken stock. Add onion, garlic, carrots, potato, ham, bay leaf. Bring to a medium boil and let boil for 20-30 minutes, occasionally stirring.  You may need to add a cup or two of water while boiling to keep it from getting too thick.  Reduce heat to simmer, add salt & pepper to taste.  Stir all, cover the pot, let simmer about an hour.

Serve with crusty bread.  Serves six.

Note

Packages of dried split peas sometimes come with a flavor packet. You can choose to use it (I don’t), but if you do, eliminate the chicken stock and use water instead.

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Crouton’s Salade Niçoise

Our State of the Union speech night dinner was a nice Niçoise, which is a really awful pun, since Niçoise basically means “Nice-style,” after the city on the French Riviera. I promise not to do it again.

Ditalini and I wanted a salad, and after Caesar and his sidekick Cobb, Niçoise is probably the best-known salad around, but one we couldn’t remember ever having before. I found an easy and not-too-Americanized recipe online and based my own Niçoise on that, with a few modifications. Apart from the vinaigrette dressing (true believers insist on olive oil alone, possibly with a little salt & pepper), I think Salade Niçoise purists would find my version acceptable, or at least not to be scorned. After all, I didn’t add corn. Or bacon. And don’t think I wasn’t tempted.

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Crouton’s Salad Niçoise


Crouton's Salad Niçoise

  • Servings: 2-4
  • Time: 30 minutes
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • For the vinaigrette:
    • 1/2 cup lemon juice
    • 3/4 cup olive oil
    • 1 medium shallot, minced
    • 1 tsp thyme
    • 1 tsp basil
    • 1 tsp oregano
    • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
    • salt, pepper
  • For the salad:
    • 2 small tuna steaks (about 4 oz each), or 2 cans tuna
    • 3-4 hard boiled eggs, peeled and quartered
    • 6-8 small potatoes, scrubbed and quartered
    • 1 head of Boston or butter lettuce
    • 2 small Roma tomatoes, quartered lengthwise
    • half a small red onion, sliced thin
    • a handful of green beans
    • 1/4 cup pitted Greek olives
    • 1 can flat anchovy filets
    • salt & pepper

Directions

Whisk vinaigrette ingredients in a small bowl, season with salt & pepper, set aside.

Boil the potatoes in salted water for 5-8 minutes until just done. Save the water, set the potatoes aside. Boil the green beans 3-5 minutes, then transfer them to a bowl of iced water to stop them from cooking any more.

Tuna: if using fresh, sear in a hot pan with a little olive oil, then cook until just done. Alternately you can use canned tuna, which doesn’t require cooking.

Pull the lettuce into bite-sized pieces, toss with vinaigrette until coated, arrange on a platter or individual dishes. Cut the potatoes in quarters, toss them in vinaigrette, arrange to one side of the lettuce. Toss the green beans in vinaigrette, arrange alongside the lettuce. Toss the tomatoes and onions in vinaigrette and arrange on top of the lettuce. Lay the flat anchovy strips on top of that. Toss the cooked tuna with vinaigrette and arrange the tuna on top (if using canned tuna, just drizzle a little vinaigrette over the tuna after putting it on top). Arrange the quartered eggs and olives along the sides of the platter or plates.

Serve with good crusty bread.

Notes

I was making two large salads. The recipe is enough for four smaller ones.

I cooked the potatoes and green beans early. I think the potatoes are prettier if you leave the skin on. When I started assembling the salad, I had everything else cut up and ready to go.

It’s very easy to overcook tuna, so don’t get distracted. Some say it’s better to just use canned tuna. Some of my friends use fresh tuna but only sear the outside, preferring it raw. Your call.

The anchovy averse (you poor sad things, you) may use capers instead of anchovies.

You can hard-boil and peel your own eggs if you prefer, but I get them at Safeway, where they come in 2-packs and 6-packs.

Seriously, don’t use mayonnaise, or bacon, or corn. I’ll sic the Gendarmerie Nicois on you if you do!

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Remodeling Crouton’s Kitchen, Part II

Progress update: Crouton’s Kitchen is a cooking blog, so in addition to recipes, most posts contain photos and commentary on the meals Ditalini and I prepare. Now there’s an easy way to print just the part of the post you want to use in the kitchen, the actual recipe (ingredients and directions).

Here’s a screenshot. Look for the blue print cue, click it, and voilà, WYSIWYG on a piece of paper. Who loves ya, baby? Crouton deMenthe, that’s who!

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p.s. So far I’ve added this feature to newer posts only. Eventually I’ll get around to the older ones. Please be patient.

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U.S. Senate Navy Bean Soup

We’ve experimented with different navy bean soup recipes over the years; this time we’re trying an authentic-seeming Food Network recipe (I compared it to the actual U.S. Senate cafeteria recipe listed on Wikipedia and it’s a match in ingredients and relative proportions, right down to the mashed potatoes). So why not just use the recipe on Wikipedia? Because it’s sized to feed multitudes; this one’s sized for a family. If, like the deMenthes, you’re cooking for two, leftover storage won’t require a second refrigerator.

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U.S. Senate navy bean soup & biscuits

U.S. Senate Navy Bean Soup

  • Servings: 8
  • Time: 3 hours
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 lb dried navy beans
  • 1 lb ham w/bone (or one ham hock plus some cut-up leftover ham)
  • 1 large potato, peeled & quartered
  • kosher salt
  • ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley

Directions

Cover beans with water and soak overnight. Drain beans, place in large pot or Dutch oven, add ham and 10 cups water. Heat until it begins to roll, then reduce heat to low and cook until beans are tender, about 1 hour and 30 minutes. If you used a ham hock, remove it now, pick off the meat, and return meat to the pot.

Meanwhile, cover potato with water in a saucepan, add salt, and bring to boil. Reduce heat to low or simmer and cook potato until fork-tender, about 20-25 minutes. Drain, put potato in bowl with milk and mash until smooth. Add mashed potato to the beans & ham and stir until smooth.

While potato is cooking, melt butter in skillet over medium heat, add chopped onion, garlic, and celery and cook until translucent, 7-10 minutes. Add vegetables to the pot, reduce heat to low, and simmer another hour. Salt & pepper to taste, garnish with chopped parsley.

This was our dinner tonight. I made the soup and Ditalini made the biscuits. We’re totally sold on this recipe. The other navy bean soup recipes on Crouton’s Kitchen (this one and this one) are good, but this one is great!

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Remodeling Crouton’s Kitchen

Over the next few days (weeks?) we’ll be experimenting with a new look for Crouton’s Kitchen. There’s a lot to like about the current design, but it’s time for something different. The kitchen will remain open, but there may be some construction dust … please pardon the inconvenience.

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Venison Chili à la David Rainier

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The Cannolis, Ditalini’s sister Gina and her husband Lengua, visited over Christmas, bringing with them venison from deer hunter country, upstate Michigan. The other day I pulled out a package of ground venison out of the freezer and decided to do something with it. Chili sounded about right, and I quickly found an interesting recipe on the net, attributed to an Alabama man named David Rainier.

His recipe called for four pounds of ground venison and the other ingredients were scaled accordingly, making a big batch of chili to serve 10-12. I had about a pound and a half, so I scaled everything back. His version called for liquid crab boil … that’s what caught my eye, by the way, and I’m glad it did … but all I had was a can of powdered Old Bay seasoning, so I substituted. What follows is my version of Mr. Rainier’s recipe, tailored to the ingredients I had on hand, which makes enough to serve 4-6.

Venison Chili à la David Rainier

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Time: 3 hours
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 lb ground venison
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced (optional)
  • 1 can diced tomatoes
  • 1 can tomato sauce
  • 2 cans kidney beans
  • 3-4 tbsp chili powder
  • 1 dash cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp Old Bay seasoning
  • salt to taste
  • 1/2 tsp garlic salt
  • 2 bay leaves

Directions

Heat olive oil in a heavy cooking pot and sauté garlic, onions and pepper until tender. Add venison and brown for 10 minutes over medium heat. Add tomatoes, tomato sauce, kidney beans, chili powder, cayenne pepper, Old Bay, salt, garlic salt. Mix together and add bay leaves. Bring to a boil and simmer uncovered for 2-3 hours.

This chili is surprisingly rich. Not sure if it’s the Old Bay or what, but it was great, even if far from traditional. We served it with cornbread made from the standard recipe that comes on the cornmeal box, improved upon with diced Hatch chilis and shredded cheddar added to the mix just before baking.

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Crouton’s Better Package Cornbread

When Ditalini and I make chili, we make cornbread. When we have the time and the ingredients, we make fancy cornbread (check the recipe index for some recipes). When we don’t, we use the package recipe on the side of the cornmeal box, improved with added ingredients.

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Cornbread w/Uncle Art’s Chili con Carne (see recipe index)

This recipe is the basic package one, with added diced Hatch chiles and shredded Cheddar cheese, and is pretty damn good with any kind of chili.

Crouton's Better Package Cornbread

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Time: 30 min
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup corn meal
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 small can diced Hatch chiles
  • 1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese

Directions

Heat oven to 400°F. Grease 8-9″ pan. Combine dry ingredients. Stir in milk, oil, egg, chiles, and half the shredded cheese, mixing just until dry ingredients are moistened. Pour batter into prepared pan and sprinkle the rest of the shredded cheese on top. Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until light golden brown and wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Serve warm (butter & honey optional but encouraged). Makes enough for 9 servings.

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Bacon-Wrapped Venison Backstrap w/Garlic Cream Sauce

Ditalini’s sister Gina Cannoli visited over the holidays, accompanied by her husband Lengua. They brought along several frozen packs of dressed venison from a recent hunting trip. Two of the packages contained backstrap, the tenderloin of a deer, a highly-regarded cut of meat. The other day I thawed out one package, which contained four cuts of backstrap, and went looking for a good recipe. This is the one I found and adapted.

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Bacon-wrapped venison backstrap ready to roast

Bacon-Wrapped Venison Backstrap w/Garlic Cream Sauce

  • Servings: 2-4
  • Time: 1 hr 30 min
  • Difficulty: medium
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Ingredients

  • Venison:
    • 4-8 slices thick-cut bacon
    • 4 pieces venison backstrap, cut in 3″ to 4″ lengths
    • olive oil
    • onion powder
    • kosher salt
    • ground pepper
  • Garlic cream sauce:
    • 1 1/2 tbsp butter
    • 8 mushrooms, sliced
    • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
    • 1 tbsp green onion, chopped
    • 1/2 cup heavy or whipping cream

Directions

Venison:

Preheat oven to 375°F. Place bacon on a slotted baking pan, bake 6 minutes until partially cooked but still soft. While cooking, brush venison w/olive oil and sprinkle w/onion powder, salt, pepper.
Wrap venison in bacon, place in roasting pan and return to the oven. Roast until bacon is browned and meat reaches 145°F, about 45 minutes.

Garlic cream sauce:

Melt 1 1/2 tbsp butter in saucepan, add mushrooms and garlic and sauté until soft. Stir in green onions, pour in cream. Cook while stirring until sauce is hot, serve with or over the venison.

Serving Suggestion

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Bacon-wrapped venison with sautéed Swiss chard and potatoes

The Swiss chard is one of Ditalini’s recipes, which I have not yet shared here, but since it includes bacon (and feta cheese), our hunter’s feast was a heavy on bacon … which is a good thing, especially if you want your guests to think you were the hunter! The potato recipe is here.

Venison always seems to cook up dry, and that was our experience with this recipe (the bacon wrapping and cream sauce are clearly meant to ameliorate that, and definitely help). It was tasty and I would try it again, but since only one package of venison backstrap remains in the freezer, I’ll use a different recipe next time and post the results here.

Happy hunting!

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